German Military Aircraft Designations (1933-1945) Copyright © 2001-2008 Andreas Parsch

1 German Aircraft Designation System
2 Designation Listing
3 German Aircraft Engine Designations
4 Sources

1 German Aircraft Designation System

Between 1919 and about 1930 most major German aircraft manufacturers used sequential numbering systems to designate their models, with various types of prefixes. This led of course to many duplications of numbers, e.g. there were no less than six different aircraft designs with number 33 (Caspar C 33, Focke-Wulf A 33, Heinkel HD 33, Junkers W 33, Klemm L 33, BFW M 33). Around 1929/30 the Heereswaffenamt (Bureau of Army Weapons), together with other institutions and the aircraft industry, devised a system of allocating a unique number to every German aircraft design. Prefixes were also standardized, and were to consist of two letters designating the manufacturing company. When the Nazis came to power in early 1933, the newly-formed RLM (Reichsluftfahrtministerium - Reich Ministry of Aviation) took over and refined this aircraft designation system. The RLM also became responsible for the centralized assignment of model numbers to all civil and military aircraft approved for development and production. Typical designations for German aircraft of the period looked as follows:
Examples: Me
262 A - 1a

  "Schwalbe"

Fw
190 A - 3 / U4

"Würger"

Ta
152 H - 0




Go
345 B






Me
163



V10
"Komet"

8 - 344







(2)
(1) (3)
(4) (5) (6)
(7)
The model number (1) was to be unique for all assignments made after 1930. The list of numbers was maintained by the Technical Department, Division for Devolopment and Procurement of the RLM. The symbol for this division was GL/C, therefore the list is known as the RLM-GL/C list. Numbers were often allocated in blocks of five or more sequential numbers to the manufacturers, who were then free to use them for their new designs. Related designs were frequently assigned numbers in steps of 100, e.g. the Me 210, Me 310, Me 410 were all successive designs intended to replace the basic Bf 110.
(2) The model number was prefixed by a two-letter symbol for the manufacturer (or designer in a few cases) of the aircraft. In official RLM paperwork, aircraft model numbers were mostly prefixed by the number 8 and a dash (similarly, piston engines used designations with a "9-" prefix, while jet engines were prefixed with "109-"). For gliders, which used model numbers in a separate series, the prefix number was 108. Of course, general references to aircraft normally used the manufacturers' prefixes, usually without a dash. However, it is pointless to ask whether a certain model was officially designated "Bf-109", "Me 109", "ME-109", or any other variation on the theme. Probably all variants can be found somewhere in industrial, military, governmental and other documents of the time, but for the RLM it was essentially an "8-109" (although designations with letter prefixes appear in RLM documents as well). The usage of all-uppercase prefixes (e.g. "FW" vs. "Fw") was also inconsistent, but the official guideline was mixed-case with a few authorized exceptions (e.g. "BV"). In this document I use the nomenclature as shown in the standard reference source [1].
The following list includes the commonly used manufacturers' and designers' prefix letters:
  • Al - Albatros Flugzeugwerke GmbH
  • Ao - AGO (Aktiengesellschaft Otto) Flugzeugwerke GmbH
  • Ar - Arado Flugzeugwerke GmbH
  • As - Argus-Motoren GmbH
  • Ba - Bachem-Werke GmbH
  • Bf - Bayerische Flugzeugwerke A.G. (Messerschmitt); changed to Me in 1938
  • Bü - Bücker Flugzeugbau GmbH
  • BV - Blohm & Voß, Abteilung Flugzeugbau; originally Ha
  • DFS - Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Segelflug
  • Do - Dornier Werke GmbH
  • Fa - Focke, Achgelis & Co. GmbH
  • Fg - Flugtechnische Fertigungsgemeinschaft Prag GmbH
  • Fh - Flugzeugbau Halle GmbH (Siebel); changed to Si in 1936
  • Fi - Gerhard Fieseler Werke GmbH
  • FK - Flugzeugbau Kiel GmbH
  • Fl - Anton Flettner GmbH
  • Fw - Focke-Wulf Flugzeugbau GmbH
  • Go - Gothaer Waggonfabrik A.G.
  • Ha - Hamburger Flugzeugbau GmbH (Blohm & Voß); changed to BV in 1937
  • He - Ernst Heinkel A.G.
  • Ho - Reimar und Walter Horten
  • Hs - Henschel Flugzeugwerke A.G.
  • Hü - Dr.-Ing. Ulrich Hütter
  • Ju - Junkers Flugzeug- und Motorenwerke A.G.
  • Ka - Dipl.-Ing. Albert Kalkert (designer at Gothaer Waggonfabrik A.G.)
  • Kl - Hans Klemm Flugzeugbau
  • Li - Dr. Alexander Lippisch (designer at DFS and Messerschmitt A.G.)
  • Me - Messerschmitt A.G.; originally Bf
  • NR - Nagler-Rolz Flugzeugbau
  • Si - Siebel Flugzeugwerke K.G.; originally Fh
  • So - Heinz Sombold
  • Sk - Skoda-Kauba Flugzeugbau
  • Ta - Dipl.-Ing. Kurt Tank (chief designer at Focke-Wulf Flugzeugbau GmbH)
  • We - Weser Flugzeugbau
  • Wn - WNF (Wiener-Neustädter-Flugzeugwerke) GmbH
  • ZMe - Luftschiffbau Zeppelin GmbH, Abteilung Flugzeugbau / Messerschmitt
  • ZSo - Luftschiffbau Zeppelin GmbH, Abteilung Flugzeugbau / SNCASO
(3) Upper-case suffix letters were used to designate major versions. The letters were normally assigned alphabetically, the first production version being model "A". Of course there were some exceptions, e.g. when the suffix "R" was assigned to a Rekordflugzeug (record aircraft, i.e. a model modified for the specific purpose to break a record). Also, "H" was used to designate a Höhenflugzeug (high-altitude aircraft) in several cases. In the early years (until around 1935), the suffix letters were sometimes written in lower case, especially for prototypes and non-production models. Prototypes and test aircraft used no suffix letters in their designations (except for the "V", see item (6) below).
(4) Additional numerical suffixes were used to designate subtypes of a version, with number 0 frequently being used for pre-series production runs. In some cases, this was not enough, and lower-case suffix letters were appended to distinguish between configurations of a subtype.
(5) Sometimes modifications were designated by "/Un" (U = Umrüstbausatz - conversion kit) or "/Rn" (R = Rüstsatz - add-on kit). Both suffixes were used for one-off and small series alterations to production models. The general guideline was to use /Un for factory modifications, and /Rn for field or maintenance depot modifications, but there were numerous exceptions. Another suffix was "/Trop", which was sometimes used to designate aircraft specifically modified to operate in a hot ("tropical") environment.
(6) From about 1935 onwards, prototypes and test models usually had no version suffix letter, but used a "V" (Versuchsflugzeug - experimental aircraft) suffix instead. The number following the V designated individual aircraft and not models, i.e. Me 262V3 was the third prototype of the Me 262 and not the third experimental model. The Vn suffixes are sometimes written with a dash, as V-n. Because "V" planes did not use model suffix letters, it is impossible to know from the designation to which model series a certain prototype or test aircraft belonged.
(7) The usage of "popular names" for aircraft was not very common in Germany, other than in Britain or the USA. Sometimes the manufacturer and/or the RLM assigned a name for commercial or propaganda purposes (the He 162 "Volksjäger" being the classical example for the latter), but these names rarely caught on, and the aircraft were usually referred to by their RLM number.

2 Designation Listing

The listing includes all aircraft from the RLM-GL/C lists in sources [1], [2], [3] and [6]. Color coding is used in the designation column to indicate "non-standard" entries, as follows:
  • The majority of numbers up to around 70 are manufacturers' numbers not originally assigned by the RLM, but included retroactively in the RLM-GL/C list until 1933. Therefore there are often other more or less well known German aircraft with the same number, which are nevertheless not included in the official list. Some of these are presented here anyway, with their designations shown in red.
  • The lists in sources [2] and [3] contain numerous duplicate numbers, most of which are not found in source [1]. These are shown in blue (except for obvious pre-1930 manufacturers' numbers, which are red).
  • Some numbers were allocated to certain manufacturers, but no projects with these numbers are known. These numbers, which were either allocated to unknown projects or never used at all, are shown in gray.
  • Some captured enemy aircraft, or Luftwaffe aircraft manufactured by Germany's allies, were also included in the RLM-GL/C list. The numbers were always derived from the constructor's original model number, which could cause duplication of an already used number. RLM numbers derived from foreign manufacturers' model numbers are displayed in green. Captured aircraft, which are not included in the RLM lists in one of my sources are outside the scope of this designation listing.
  • The list in source [6] includes a few highly questionable entries, which are shown in orange. If these aircraft projects really existed, they most probably never progressed beyond the drawing board.
  • There are also a few numbers which do not appear in the RLM-GL/C lists (and which may or may not have been allocated by the RLM), but which are found in one or more other sources. These are presented in light brown.
The RLM-GL/C list also includes several unmanned aircraft and missiles. The general guideline was to assign numbers in the "8-" aircraft series to all missiles and guided bombs of mainly aerodynamic (i.e. winged) design (e.g. Fi 103 / V-1), but not to ballistic missiles (e.g. A-4 / V-2).
Notes:
  • Designations are written without a dash between the manufacturer's code and the RLM number, because that's the most common practice. As indicated above, the official RLM prefix for all model numbers was "8-".
  • Dates given in parenthesis are meant to show the general time frame of the aircraft, and not exact references to the first flight or other dates. Generally the year of completion of the first prototype is given, or - for unbuilt projects - the year of the major design effort. In many cases I had to make educated guesses from the context, so small errors are possible.
  • The RLM-GL/C list in source [3] includes a few company project numbers (mainly Arado ones). These are not included here, because it is generally accepted that these numbers (usually prefixed E, EF, P, etc., depending on manufacturer) are not part of the proper RLM list.
Designation Manufacturer Remarks
(1) Not assigned
Fi 2 Fieseler Originally designated F-2; acrobatic sportsplane (1932)
(3...4) Not assigned
Fi 5 Fieseler Originally designated F-5; two-seat acrobatic sportplane and trainer (1933)
8-6 Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Segelflug Model DFS Mo 6; target glider for flak training (1936); prototypes only
(7) Not assigned
8-8 (note 1) Göppingen Model Gö 8; unpowered 1/5th scale aerodynamic model of planned Do 214 (1940); one built
8-9 (note 1) Göppingen Model Gö 9; powered aerodynamic scale model of planned Do 335 (1941)
Do 10 Dornier Originally designated Do C1; two-seat fighter (1931); prototype only
Do 11 Dornier Originally designated Do F; twin-engine medium bomber (1932)
Wn 11 WNF Originally designated HV 11; twin-engine travel amphibian (1934)
Do 12 Dornier "Libelle"; single-engine amphibian sportplane (1932)
8-12 Zlin Model Zlin XII; two-seat light sportplane (1935); captured in Czechoslovakia, and used for training
Do 13 Dornier Twin-engine medium bomber (1933); improved Do 11
Do 14 Dornier Amphibian for propulsion research (1934); prototype only
Do 15 Dornier "Militär-Wal 33"; twin-engine reconnaissance seaplane (1933)
Wn 15 WNF Originally designated HV 15; twin-engine travel aircraft (1934)
Wn 16 WNF Single-engine aircraft for tricycle/tail-dragging landing-gear research (1939); one built
Do 16 Dornier Twin-engine reconnaissance seaplane (1934); derivative of Do 15
Do 17 Dornier Twin-engine medium bomber (1934); production 1936-1940
Do 18 Dornier Twin-engine long-range flying boat (1935)
Do 19 Dornier Four-engine heavy bomber (1936); prototypes only
Do 20 Dornier Eight-engine intercontinental-range passenger flying boat (1935); project only
(21) Not assigned
Do 22 Dornier Single-engine utility floatplane (1934); produced for export only
Do 23 Dornier Twin-engine medium bomber (1934); improved Do 11/Do 13
Do 24 Dornier Three-engine reconnaissance flying boat (1936)
Kl 25 Klemm Originally designated L 25; two-seat sportplane and trainer (1927); production 1927-1939
Do 25 Dornier 8-25 was reserved for Dornier, but not used (later used by post-war Dornier company)
Do 26 Dornier Four-engine long-range flying boat (1938)
Kl 26 Klemm Originally designated L 26; two-seat sportplane and trainer (1929); development of Kl 25; production 1930-1936
Do 27 Dornier 8-27 was reserved for Dornier, but not used (later used by post-war Dornier company)
8-27 (note 2) Messerschmitt Model M 27; two-seat sport and training aircraft (1930)
(28) Not assigned
Do 29 Dornier Bomber; project only
8-29 (note 3) Akaflieg Darmstadt Single-engine training aircraft (1937)
8-30 Focke-Wulf Single-engine autogyro (1933); Cierva C.30 license-built by Focke-Wulf
Kl 31 Klemm Single-engine travel aircraft (1931); production 1931-1935
Kl 32 Klemm Single-engine travel aircraft (1931); derivative of Kl 31; production 1932-1935
Ju 33 (note 4) Junkers Originally designated W 33; single-engine transport aircraft (1926)
Kl 33 Klemm Originally designated L 33; single-seat ultra-light sportplane (1933); prototype only
Ju 34 (note 4) Junkers Originally designated W 34; single-engine transport, photo-reconnaissance, and navigation training aircraft (1934); derivative of Ju 33
Kl 35 Klemm Two-seat acrobatic sportplane and trainer (1935); production 1935-1941
Kl 36 Klemm Single-engine travel aircraft (1934)
He 37 Heinkel 8-37 was reserved for Heinkel, but not used
He 38 Heinkel Originally designated H.D.38; single-seat fighter/trainer float biplane (1928)
Ju 38 (note 4) Junkers Originally designated G 38; four-engine long-range passenger and cargo transport (1929); only two built
DFS 39 Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Segelflug "Delta IV"; single-engine flying-wing research aircraft (1935); one built
DFS 40 Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Segelflug "Delta V"; single-engine flying-wing research aircraft; one built; number 8-40 later reallocated to Blohm & Voß
BV 40 Blohm & Voß Combat glider (1944); unpowered miniature single-seat fighter, to be towed into action by Bf 109G; prototype only
Fw 40 Focke-Wulf Short-range observation plane (1931); prototype only
He 41 Heinkel 8-41 was reserved for Heinkel, but not used
He 42 Heinkel Two-seat training float biplane (1931)
Fw 42 Focke-Wulf Twin-engine medium bomber (1933); canard layout; project only
Fw 43 Focke-Wulf "Falke"; single-engine small passenger plane (1932); prototypes only
Fw 44 Focke-Wulf "Stieglitz"; two-seat acrobatic training biplane; large-scale production
He 45 Heinkel Single-engine short-range reconnaissance biplane (1932)
He 46 Heinkel Single-engine observation biplane (1933)
Ju 46 Junkers Single-engine high-speed mail landplane/floatplane (1932); derivative of Ju 34
Fw 47 Focke-Wulf Single-engine weather reconnaissance aircraft (1932)
He 47 Heinkel Single-engine light bomber; project only
K 47 Junkers Single-engine two-seat fighter (1928); for export only
Ju 48 (note 4) Junkers Originally designated A 48; two-seat fighter trainer (1928); unarmed version K 47
Ju 49 Junkers Single-engine high-altitude research aircraft (1931); one built
He 49 Heinkel Single-seat biplane fighter (1932); prototype only
He 50 Heinkel Two-seat torpedo dive-bomber biplane (1932)
A 50 Junkers "Junior"; two-seat sportplane (1929)
He 51 Heinkel Single-seat biplane fighter (1932); derivative of He 49; first Luftwaffe standard fighter
K 51 Junkers Four-engine heavy bomber (1933); derivative of Ju 38; license-built in Japan only (as Mitsubishi Ki 20)
Ju 52 Junkers Ju 52/1m: single-engine transport aircraft (1931); pre-production only (soon switched to 3m version)
Ju 52/3m: three-engine passenger and cargo transport aircraft (1932); standard German military and civilian transport; production 1932-1944; post-war production in France (Amiot AAC.1) and Spain (CASA 352)
He 52 Heinkel Single-seat high-altitude biplane fighter (1936); derivative of He 51; prototypes only
8-53 (note 5) Junkers Model K 53; two-seat short-range reconnaissance aircraft (1926); built in Sweden only
NR 54 Nagler-Rolz Collapsible and portable ultra-light single-seat miniature helicopter (1941); prototype only
DFS 54 Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Segelflug High-altitude pressurized seaplane; project only
NR 55 Nagler-Rolz Single-seat miniature helicopter (1940); prototype only
Fw 55 Focke-Wulf Two-seat sportplane and trainer (1932); slightly modified Al 102
Fw 56 Focke-Wulf "Stößer"; single-seat advanced trainer (1933); standard Luftwaffe fighter/attack trainer
He 56 Heinkel Two-seat observation float biplane (1936); license-built in Japan only (as Aichi E3A1, Type 90 Naval Reconnaissance Aircraft)
Fw 57 Focke-Wulf Twin-engine heavy fighter (1935); prototypes only, for competition with Bf 110
8-57 North American Model NA-57 (U.S. designation BT-9); single-engine trainer (1939); captured in France
Fw 58 Focke-Wulf "Weihe"; twin-engine utility and training aircraft (1934); standard Luftwaffe multi-engine trainer
He 58 Heinkel Single-engine mail floatplane (1930); prototype only
He 59 Heinkel Large twin-engine utility float biplane (1930)
He 60 Heinkel Single-engine utility float biplane (1930)
Ju 60 Junkers Single-engine high-speed mail and passenger aircraft (1933); prototype only, in competition with He 70
Fa 61 (note 6) Focke-Achgelis Single-seat twin-rotor research helicopter (1936); world's first successful true helicopter;
He 61 Heinkel Single-engine short-range reconnaissance biplane; derivative of He 45; for export only
Fw 62 Focke-Wulf Single-engine utility float biplane (1938), prototypes only
He 62 Heinkel Two-seat observation float biplane; derivative of He 56; license production in Japan only (as Aichi AB 5)
He 63 Heinkel Two-seat training biplane (1932); prototypes only
8-63 Potez Model 63; twin-engine multirole combat aircraft (1936); captured in France
He 64 Heinkel Single-engine light high-performance sportplane (1932); prototype only
Ar 64 Arado Single-seat fighter biplane (1930); prototypes only
Ar 65 Arado Single-seat fighter biplane (1931); production until 1935
He 65 Heinkel Single-engine high-speed mailplane (1932); project only
Ar 66 Arado Two-seat biplane trainer (1933)
He 66 Heinkel Two-seat torpedo dive-bomber biplane (1932); derivative of He 50; export only
Ar 67 Arado Experimental single-seat fighter biplane (1933); one prototype for engine tests
Ar 68 Arado Single-seat fighter biplane (1933); used in numbers until 1938
Ar 69 Arado Two-seat biplane trainer (1933); prototypes only
He 70 Heinkel "Blitz"; single-engine high-speed passenger and mailplane (1932)
He 71 Heinkel Single-seat sportplane (1933)
8-71 Avia Model B.71; twin-engine medium bomber (1937); license-built Tupolev SB-2-M100A; captured in Czechoslovakia, and used for target towing
He 72 Heinkel "Kadett"; two-seat training biplane (1933)
He 73 Heinkel 8-73 was allocated to Heinkel, but no details are available; possibly not used
He 74 Heinkel Single-seat training biplane (1933); prototypes only
Al 75 Albatros "Ass"; originally designated L 75; two-seat sport and training biplane (1928)
Ar 76 Arado Single-seat acrobatics and training aircraft (1933); prototype only, for competition with Fw 56
Ar 77 Arado Twin-engined trainer (1934); prototypes only, for competition with Fw 58
Ar 78 Arado 8-78 was allocated to Arado, but no details are available; possibly not used
Ar 79 Arado Two-seat sportplane and trainer (1937)
Ar 80 Arado Single-seat fighter (1934); prototypes only, for 1935 fighter competition with Bf 109, He 112 and Fw 159
Ar 81 Arado Two-seat dive-bomber biplane (1936); prototypes only, for 1936 dive-bomber competition with Ju 87, He 118 and Ha 137
8-82 Savoia-Marchetti Model SM.82 "Canguru"/"Marsupiale"; three-engine heavy bomber and transport (1938); built in Italy
(83) Not assigned
Al 84 (note 7) Albatros Originally designated L 84; two-seat biplane fighter (1931); prototypes only
Ju 85 Junkers Twin-engine high-speed bomber (1938); derivative of Ju 88; project only
Ju 86 Junkers Twin-engine passenger aircraft, transport, bomber, and reconnaissance aircraft (1936); production 1937-1940
Ju 87 Junkers "Stuka" (for Sturzkampfbomber = dive-bomber); two-seat dive-bomber and ground-attack aircraft (1936); production 1937-1944
Ju 88 Junkers Twin-engine high-speed bomber and multirole (reconnaissance aircraft, night-fighter, heavy fighter) combat aircraft (1937); standard Luftwaffe twin-engine combat aircraft; production 1939-1945
Ju 89 Junkers Four-engine heavy bomber (1936); prototypes only
Ju 90 Junkers Four-engine transport aircraft (1937); few built
Ju 91 Junkers 8-91 was allocated to Junkers, but no details are available; possibly not used
Ju 92 Junkers Four-engine bomber and troop transport; possibly confusion with other Ju aircraft or project
Ju 93 Junkers 8-93 was allocated to Junkers, but no details are available; possibly not used
Ju 94 Junkers 8-94 was allocated to Junkers, but no details are available; possibly not used
Ar 95 Arado Single-engine utility float-biplane (1936)
Ar 96 Arado Two-seat trainer (1939); standard Luftwaffe training aircraft; production 1939-1945
Fi 97 Fieseler Single-engine light utility aircraft (1934)
Fi 98 Fieseler Single-seat dive-bomber biplane (1935); prototypes only
Fi 99 Fieseler "Jungtiger"; single-engine light utility aircraft (1938)
He 100 (note 8) Heinkel Single-seat fighter (1938); pre-production only
Al 101 Albatros Originally designated L 101; two-seat sportsplane/trainer (1930)
Al 102 Albatros Originally designated L 102; two-seat sportsplane/trainer (1931)
Al 103 Albatros Originally designated L 103; two-seat sportsplane/trainer (1932); prototype only
Fi 103 Fieseler Pulsejet-powered surface-to-surface cruise missile; see also note 9
Fh 104 Flugzeugbau Halle "Hallore"; twin-engine light passenger transport (1936); a Klemm design, originally designated Kl 104
Kl 105 Klemm Single-engine travel aircraft (1938); prototypes only
Kl 106 Klemm Two-seat sportplane (1939); prototype only
Kl 107 Klemm Single-engine travel and training aircraft (1939)
Bf 108 BFW / Messerschmitt "Taifun"; single-engine travel and liaison aircraft (1934); large-scale production; post-war production in France (Nord 1000 "Pingouin")
Bf 109 BFW / Messerschmitt Single-seat fighter (1935); standard Luftwaffe fighter 1938-1945; very large production run 1937-1945; post-war production in Czechoslovakia (Avia S-99/S-199) and Spain (Hispano HA-1109/HA-1112)
Bf 110 BFW / Messerschmitt Twin-engine two-seat heavy fighter, night-fighter, and bomber (1936); standard Luftwaffe twin-engine fighter; production 1938-1945
He 111 Heinkel Twin-engine medium bomber (1937); standard Luftwaffe bomber; production 1937-1944; post-war production in Spain (CASA 2111)
He 112 Heinkel Single-seat fighter (1935); prototypes for 1935 fighter competition with Ar 80, Bf 109 and Fw 159; small production for export only
He 113 Heinkel Number 8-113 was never used for a "real" aircraft, see note 10
He 114 Heinkel Single-engine reconnaissance floatplane (1937)
He 115 Heinkel Twin-engine patrol and torpedo floatplane (1937); production 1938-1944
He 116 Heinkel Four-engine long-range mailplane and reconnaissance aircraft (1938)
Hs 117 (note 11) Henschel "Schmetterling"; winged surface-to-air guided missile (1944); radio-command guidance; production 1945
He 118 Heinkel Two-seat dive-bomber (1936); prototypes only, for 1936 dive-bomber competition with Ar 81, Ju 87 and Ha 137
He 119 Heinkel Single-engine high-speed bomber, reconnaissance aircraft, and record aircraft (1937); prototypes only
He 120 Heinkel Four-engine long-range passenger flying-boat (1938); project only
Hs 121 Henschel Single-seat advanced trainer (1934); prototype only
Hs 122 Henschel Two-seat short-range observation aircraft (1935)
Hs 123 Henschel Single-seat dive-bombing and ground-attack biplane (1935)
Hs 124 Henschel Twin-engine multirole combat aircraft (1935); prototypes only
Hs 125 Henschel Single-seat advanced trainer (1936); prototype only
Hs 126 Henschel Single-engine observation, short-range reconnaissance and glider-towing aircraft (1937); production 1939-1941
Hs 127 Henschel Twin-engine high-speed bomber (1937); prototypes only
Hs 128 Henschel Twin-engine high-altitude research aircraft (1939); two built
Hs 129 Henschel Twin-engine ground-attack aircraft (1939); production 1940-1942
Hs 130 Henschel Twin-engine high-altitude bomber and reconnaissance aircraft (1940); prototypes only
Bü 131 Bücker "Jungmann"; two-seat acrobatics and training biplane (1936)
Hs 132 (note 12) Henschel Single-jet dive-bomber and ground-attack aircraft (1945); prototype not completed
Bü 133 Bücker "Jungmeister"; single-seat acrobatics and advanced training biplane (1936)
Bü 134 Bücker Single-engine light utility plane (1936); prototype only
Ha 135 Hamburger Flugzeugbau / Blohm & Voß Experimental training biplane (1933); prototype only
Ha 136 Hamburger Flugzeugbau / Blohm & Voß Experimental training aircraft (1933); prototypes only
Ha 137 Hamburger Flugzeugbau / Blohm & Voß Single-seat dive-bomber (1936); prototypes only, for 1936 dive-bomber competition with Ar 81, Ju 87 and He 118
BV 138 Blohm & Voß Originally designated Ha 138; three-engine reconnaissance flying boat (1936); production 1940-1943
Ha 139 Hamburger Flugzeugbau / Blohm & Voß Four-engine long-range seaplane (1937); 3 examples built
Ha 140 Hamburger Flugzeugbau / Blohm & Voß Twin-engine utility float plane (1937); prototypes only
BV 141 Blohm & Voß Single-engine observation and reconnaissance aircraft (1938); asymmetric layout; pre-production only
Ha 142 Hamburger Flugzeugbau / Blohm & Voß Four-engine long-range landplane (1937); derivative of Ha 139B; prototypes only
BV 143 Blohm & Voß Rocket-powered air-launched glide torpedo (1941); pre-production only
BV 144 Blohm & Voß Twin-engine short/medium-range passenger aircraft (1940); prototype only
Go 145 Gotha Two-seat training biplane (1933)
Go 146 Gotha Twin-engine small passenger aircraft (1935)
Go 147 Gotha Single-engine tail-less research and training aircraft (1936); prototype only
Ju 147 Junkers Twin-engine experimental high-altitude bomber
Go 148 Gotha Number 8-148, allocated to Gotha by RLM, was not used, because sum of digits gives "unlucky" 13
Go 149 Gotha Single-seat advanced combat trainer (1936); prototypes only
Go 150 Gotha Twin-engine light sports and travel aircraft (1938)
Kl 151 Klemm Single-engine travel aircraft; prototype only
Ta 152 Focke-Wulf Single-seat high-altitude fighter (1944); derivative of Fw 190D
Kl 152 Klemm Fighter; project only; number transferred to Focke-Wulf
Ta 153 (note 13) Focke-Wulf Experimetal single-seat high-altitude fighter (1944); derivative of Fw 190D, was developed as Ta 152H; prototype only
Ta 154 (note 13) Focke-Wulf "Moskito"; twin-engine night-fighter made of wood (1943); production 1943-1944
8-155 (note 13) Messerschmitt / Blohm & Voß Me 155A: carrier-borne single-seat fighter derived from Bf 109 (1937); later changed to land-based fighter-bomber, and still later to high-altitude fighter (1942); all designs cancelled, and development transferred to Blohm & Voß
BV 155B/C: major redesign of Me 155A as high-altitude fighter (1943); prototypes only
Fi 156 Fieseler "Storch"; single-engine STOL utility aircraft (1936); production 1937-1944
Fi 157 Fieseler Unmanned radio-controlled anti-aircraft training target (1937); similar to Fi 158; prototypes only
Fi 158 Fieseler Single-engine high-speed research aircraft (1938); one built
Fw 159 Focke-Wulf Single-seat fighter (1935); prototypes only, for 1935 fighter competition with Ar 80, Bf 109 and He 112
Ju 160 Junkers Single-engine high-speed mail and passenger aircraft (1934); development of Ju 60
Bf 161 BFW / Messerschmitt Twin-engine long-range reconnaissance aircraft (1938); derivative of Bf 110B; prototypes only
Bf 162 BFW / Messerschmitt "Jaguar"; twin-engine high-speed bomber (1937); prototypes only, for competition with Ju 88
He 162 (note 14) Heinkel "Volksjäger" (note 15); single-jet single-seat fighter (1944); production 1945
Bf 163 BFW / Messerschmitt Single-engine STOL utility aircraft (1938); prototype only (built by Weserflug), for competition with Fi 156, Fw 186 and Si 201
Me 163 (note 16) Messerschmitt "Komet"; rocket-powered single-seat short-range interceptor (1941); production 1944-1945
Me 164 Messerschmitt Twin-engine high-speed utility transport (1941); prototype not completed
Bf 165 Messerschmitt Four-engine long-range bomber (1937); project only
FK 166 Flugzeugbau Kiel Single-seat training biplane (1934); prototype only; number 8-166 transferred to Fieseler
Fi 166 Fieseler Rocket/jet-powered high-altitude fighter (1941); project only
Fi 167 Fieseler Single-engine carrier-based utility biplane (1938); prototype only
Fi 168 Fieseler Armoured ground-attack aircraft (1938); prototype only
Fi 169 Fieseler 8-169 was allocated to Fieseler, but no details are available; possibly not used
He 170 Heinkel Single-engine high-speed reconnaissance aircraft (1937); derivative of He 70F for export to Hungary
He 171 Heinkel 8-171 was allocated to Heinkel, but no details are available; possibly not used
He 172 Heinkel Two-seat training biplane (1934); derivative of He 72; prototypes only
He 173 Heinkel 8-173 was allocated to Heinkel, but no details are available; possibly not used
He 174 Heinkel 8-174 was allocated to Heinkel, but no details are available; possibly not used
8-175 Bloch Model M.B.175; twin-engine bomber (1939); captured in France, and used by Luftwaffe as transport, reconnaissance and training aircraft
He 176 Heinkel Small high-speed rocket research aircraft (1939); prototypes only
He 177 Heinkel "Greif"; two- or four-engine heavy bomber and maritime patrol aircraft (1939); production 1940-1944
He 178 Heinkel Turbojet research aircraft (1939); world's first turbojet-powered plane; one built
He 179 Heinkel 8-179 was allocated to Heinkel, but no details are available; possibly not used
Bü 180 Bücker "Student"; two-seat sportplane and basic trainer (1937)
Bü 181 Bücker "Bestmann"; two-seat basic trainer (1937); standard Luftwaffe trainer 1938-1945
Bü 182 Bücker "Kornett"; single-seat advanced trainer (1938); derivative of Bü 181; prototypes only
Ta 183 (note 12) Focke-Wulf "Huckebein"; single-turbojet single-seat fighter (1945); project only
Fl 184 Flettner Two-seat autogyro (1935); prototypes only
Fl 185 Flettner Single-seat research helicopter (1937); one built
Fw 186 Focke-Wulf Single-engine utility autogyro (1937); prototypes only, for competition with Fi 156, Bf 163 and Si 201; number 8-186 later transferred to Junkers
Ju 186 Junkers High-altitude research aircraft (1941); derivative of Ju 86P; project only
Fw 187 Focke-Wulf "Falke"; twin-engine two-seat heavy fighter (1937); pre-production only
Ju 187 (note 17) Junkers Single-engine ground-attack aircraft (1942); project only
Ju 188 (note 18) Junkers "Rächer"; twin-engine medium bomber and reconnaissance aircraft (1942); production 1942-1945
Fw 189 Focke-Wulf "Eule"; twin-engine short-range reconnaissance aircraft (1938)
Fw 190 Focke-Wulf "Würger"; single-seat fighter (1939); standard Luftwaffe fighter together with Bf 109; production 1941-1945
Fw 191 Focke-Wulf Twin-engine medium bomber (1942); prototypes only, for competition with Ju 288 and Do 317
Ao 192 AGO "Kurier"; twin-engine travel and liaison aircraft (1936); pre-producion only
DFS 193 (note 19) Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Segelflug Small tail-less research aircraft (1937); not completed
DFS 194 Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Segelflug High-speed rocket research aircraft (1941); immediate precursor to Me 163; prototype only
Ar 195 Arado Single-engine utility carrier biplane (1937); derivative of Ar 95; prototype only
Ar 196 Arado Single-engine observation and reconnaissance floatplane (1939); production 1939-1943
Ar 197 Arado Carrier-based single-seat fighter biplane (1937); derivative of Ar 68; prototypes only
Ar 198 Arado Single-engine tactical reconnaissance aircraft (1938); prototype only, for competition with BV 141
Ar 199 Arado Single-engine floatplane trainer (1938); pre-production only
Fw 200 (note 20) Focke-Wulf "Condor"; long-range armed patrol and reconnaissance aircraft (1937); production 1938-1944
Do 200 (note 21) Boeing Four-engine special purpose aircraft (1942); captured Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress bombers
Si 201 Siebel Single-engine STOL utility aircraft (1937); prototypes only, for competition with Fi 156, Bf 163 and Fw 186
Si 202 Siebel "Hummel"; two-seat sportplane and trainer (1938)
DFS 203 (note 22) Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Segelflug Heavy troop and cargo glider; two DFS 230 fuselages joined to common wing; project cancelled
Si 204 Siebel Twin-engine passenger transport and navigation training aircraft (1941); development of Fh 104
(205) Not assigned
Fw 206 Focke-Wulf Short/medium-range twin-engine passenger aircraft (1939); project only
(207) Not assigned
Me 208 Messerschmitt Single-engine travel aircraft (1943); derivative of Bf 108; prototypes only, but post-war production in France (Nord 1100 "Noralpha")
Me 209 (note 23) Messerschmitt Single-engine high-speed record aircraft (1938); prototypes only
Me 210 Messerschmitt Twin-engine two-seat heavy fighter, fighter-bomber, and dive-bomber (1939); production 1941-1944
Hü 211 Hütter Twin-engine long-range reconnaissance aircraft (1944); derivative of He 219; project only
Ta 211 (note 24) Focke-Wulf Twin-engine fast attack bomber (1943); developed into Ta 154
Do 212 Dornier Single-engine research amphibian; built in Switzerland; prototype only
8-212 Zlin Model 212; two-seat primary trainer (1939); development of Zlin XII (8-12); captured in Czechoslovakia
(213) Not assigned (possibly reserved for use by Dornier)
Do 214 Dornier Eight-engine intercontinental-range passenger flying boat (1941); project only
Do 215 Dornier Twin-engine medium bomber and reconnaissance aircraft (1938); development of Do 17Z
Do 216 Dornier Six-engine long-range flying boat (1943); project only
Do 217 Dornier Twin-engine heavy bomber (1939); development of Do 17; produced 1939-1943
Do 218 Dornier 8-218 was allocated to Dornier, but no details are available; possibly not used
He 219 Heinkel "Uhu"; twin-engine high-speed night-fighter (1943); production 1943-1945
He 220 Heinkel Four-engine very long-range passenger flying-boat (1939); project only, in competition with BV 222
Do 221 Dornier 8-221 was allocated to Dornier, but no details are available; possibly not used
BV 222 Blohm & Voß "Wiking"; six-engine very long-range transport flying boat (1940); built in small numbers until 1945
Fa 223 Focke-Achgelis "Drache"; twin-rotor transport helicopter (1940); small-scale production 1942-1945
Fa 224 Focke-Achgelis Single-seat sport helicopter; derivative of Fa 61; project only
Fa 225 Focke-Achgelis Unpowered transport autogyro glider (1934); prototype only
Ao 225 AGO Twin-engine heavy fighter (1935); project only
Ho 226 Horten Model H VII; originally numbered 8-254; twin-engined flying wing research and training aircraft (1943); prototypes only; number 8-226 transferred to Focke-Wulf
Fw 226 Focke-Wulf "Flitzer"; single-jet single-seat fighter (1944); project only
BV 226 Blohm & Voß Redesignated as BV 246, q.v.; number 8-226 transferred to Horten
Fg 227 Fertigungsgemeinschaft Prag Research flying boat (1944); scale model of BV 238; one built
DFS 228 Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Segelflug Single-seat rocket-powered high-altitude reconnaissance glider (1944); prototypes only
8-229 Horten / Gotha Model H IX; twin-turbojet flying wing single-seat fighter (1945); prototype (built by Gotha as Go 229) not finished
DFS 230 Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Segelflug Troop (10-seat) and cargo glider (1939)
8-230 Morane-Saulnier Model MS-230; two-seat trainer (1929); captured in France
Ar 231 Arado U-boat-based single seat reconnaissance floatplane (1940); prototypes only
Ar 232 Arado Two-engine (232A) or four-engine (232B) transport aircraft (1942)
Ar 233 Arado Twin-engine utility amphibian (1940); cancelled project, superseeded by Ar 430
Ar 234 Arado "Blitz"; jet-powered (two or four turbojets) medium bomber and reconnaissance aircraft (1942); world's first jet bomber; production 1944-1945
Do 235 Dornier Four-engine bomber
Fa 236 Focke-Achgelis 8-236 was allocated to Focke-Achgelis, but no details are available; possibly not used
BV 237 Blohm & Voß Single-engine ground-attack aircraft (1944); asymmetric layout; project only
BV 238 Blohm & Voß Six-engine very long-range transport flying boat (1944); prototype only
Fw 238 (note 25) Focke-Wulf Four-engine long-range heavy bomber (1941); project only
Fw 239 (note 25) Focke-Wulf Twin-jet bomber (1944); also known as "1000x1000x1000 Bomber, Project A"; project only
Ar 239 Arado High-altitude bomber
Ar 240 Arado Twin-engine heavy fighter and reconnaissance aircraft (1940); prototypes only, in competition with Me 210 and He 219
Go 241 Gotha Twin-engine small passenger aircraft (1940); prototype only
Go 242 Gotha Large cargo glider (1941); large-scale production
Me 243 Messerschmitt 8-243 was allocated to Messerschmitt, but no details are available; possibly not used
Go 244 Gotha Twin-engine motorized cargo glider (1942); Go 242 equipped with captured French engines
Go 245 Gotha 8-245 was allocated to Gotha, but no details are available; possibly not used
BV 246 Blohm & Voß "Hagelkorn"; originally designated BV 226; air-launched unpowered glide bomb and anti-aircraft training target (1943); production 1944
(247) Not assigned
Ju 248 Junkers Rocket-powered single-seat point-defense interceptor (1944); Junkers-built derivative of Me 163; later redesignated Me 263; prototype only
Fw 249 (note 25) Focke-Wulf Eight-engine heavy transport aircraft (1941); also known as Focke-Wulf-Projekt 195; project only
BV 250 Blohm & Voß Six-engine very long-range transport aircraft (1944); land-based derivative of BV 238; project only; number 8-250 transferred to Focke-Wulf
Fw 250 Focke-Wulf Twin-jet fighter-bomber (1944); project only
Ho 250 Horten Model H III; flying-wing sailplane (1938)
Ho 251 Horten Model H IV; high-performance flying-wing glider (1941); prototypes only
Fw 251 (note 25) Focke-Wulf Three-seat night/all-weather jet fighter (1945); project only
Ju 252 Junkers Three-engine passenger and cargo transport (1941); pre-production only; number 8-252 transferred to Focke-Wulf
Fw 252 Focke-Wulf Single-jet single-seat fighter (1944); project only
Ho 252 Horten Model H V; twin-engine flying-wing research aircraft (1937); prototypes only
Fi 253 Fieseler "Spatz"; light sport and utility aircraft (1939); prototypes only
Ho 253 Horten Model H VI; high-performance flying-wing glider (1945); prototypes only
Ta 254 Focke-Wulf Twin-engine multipurpose combat aircraft (1944); derivative of Ta 154C; project only
Ho 254 Horten Model H VII; later redesignated as Ho 226; twin-engined flying wing research and training aircraft (1943); prototypes only
(255) Not assigned
Fi 256 Fieseler Single-engine STOL utility aircraft (1943); simplified derivative of Fi 156; prototype only
Sk 257 Skoda-Kauba Single-seat advanced fighter trainer (1943); prototypes only
(258) Not assigned
Fw 259 Focke-Wulf Fighter ("Frontjäger"); project only
(260) Not assigned
Me 261 Messerschmitt Twin-engine long-range mail and reconnaissance aircraft (1940); prototypes only
Fw 261 (note 25) Focke-Wulf Four-engine heavy bomber (1944); also known as Focke-Wulf-Projekt 0310225; project only
Me 262 Messerschmitt "Schwalbe" (fighter), "Sturmvogel" (bomber); twin-turbojet single-seat fighter and fighter-bomber, and two-seat night-fighter (1942); world's first production jet fighter; production 1944-1945
Me 263 Messerschmitt Rocket-powered single-seat point-defense interceptor (1944); derivative of Me 163; built by Junkers and originally designated Ju 248; prototype only
Me 264 Messerschmitt Four-engine long-range bomber (1941); prototype only
Fl 265 Flettner Single-seat research and observation helicopter (1938); development of Fl 185; prototypes only
Me 265 Messerschmitt Twin-engine two-seat tail-less heavy fighter (1942); project only
Fa 266 Focke-Achgelis "Hornisse"; twin-rotor passenger transport helicopter (1940); civilian version of Fa 223; project only
Go 267 Gotha 8-267 was allocated to Gotha, but no details are available; possibly not used
Ho 267 Horten Twin-turbojet all-wing aircraft; possibly identical or related to Ho/Go 229 and/or Go 267
Ju 268 Junkers Twin-turbojet unmanned expendable bomber (i.e., a cruise missile); to be used with He 162 as "Mistel 5" combination; project only
Fa 269 Focke-Achgelis Twin-engine research convertiplane (1943); project only
He 270 Heinkel Single-engine high-speed utility aircraft (1938); derivative of He 70F; prototype only
We 271 Weserflug Twin-engine light utility amphibian (1938); prototype only
Fw 272 (note 11) Focke-Wulf Mixed-power (one piston, two turbojet) multipurpose fighter (1944); project only
He 273 Heinkel 8-273 was allocated to Heinkel, but no details are available; possibly not used
He 274 Heinkel Four-engine high-altitude bomber (1944); derivative of He 177; prototype built by Farman (France), and finished 1945 after end of WW II
He 275 Heinkel Four-engine bomber (1945); project only; see note 26
He 276 Heinkel 8-276 was allocated to Heinkel, but no details are available; possibly not used
He 277 Heinkel Four-engine long-range heavy bomber (1944); derivative of He 177B; project only
He 278 Heinkel Four-engine turboprop bomber; project only
He 279 Heinkel 8-279 was allocated to Heinkel, but no details are available; possibly not used
He 280 (note 27) Heinkel Twin-turbojet single-seat fighter (1941); world's first turbojet fighter; prototypes only
Fw 281 (note 11) Focke-Wulf Turboprop-powered single-seat fighter (1945); turboprop version of Focke-Wulf "Flitzer" jet fighter design; project only
Fl 282 Flettner "Kolibri"; small observation helicopter (1941); pre-production only
Ta 283 Focke-Wulf Twin-ramjet powered single-seat fighter (1945); project only
Fa 283 Focke-Achgelis Turbojet-powered autogyro; project only
Fa 284 Focke-Achgelis Large twin-rotor flying-crane helicopter (1943); project only
Fl 285 Flettner Helicopter; project only
Ju 286 Junkers Six-engine high-altitude bomber (1942); project only
Ju 287 Junkers Four-jet medium bomber (1944); one proof-of-concept prototype only (significantly different from planned six-jet production version)
Ju 288 Junkers Twin-engine medium bomber (1941); prototypes only, for competition with Fw 191 and Do 317
Ju 289 Junkers 8-289 was allocated to Junkers, but no details are available; possibly not used
Ju 290 Junkers "Seeadler"; four-engine heavy transport and long-range patrol aircraft (1941); derivative of Ju 90
Hs 291 Henschel Possibly an air-launched anti-ship missile; project only
As 292 (note 28) Argus Small unmanned target drone for gunnery training (1939)
Hs 293 Henschel Air-launched anti-ship guided missile (1942); radio-command guidance; production 1943-1945
Hs 294 Henschel Air-launched anti-ship guided missile (1943); radio-command guidance
Hs 295 Henschel Air-launched anti-ship guided missile (1944); radio-command or wire guidance; prototypes only
Hs 296 Henschel Air-launched anti-ship guided missile (1944); derivative of Hs 293H with TV guidance; prototypes only
Ar 296 Arado Proposed variant of Ar 96 trainer, to be built with non-strategic materials; project only
Hs 297 Henschel Original designation of "Schmetterling"; winged surface-to-air guided missile (1944); became Hs 117
Hs 298 Henschel Air-to-air guided missile (1944); radio-command guidance; prototypes only
Ju 299 Junkers 8-299 was allocated to Junkers, but no details are available; possibly not used
Fw 300 Focke-Wulf Four-engine trans-atlantic passenger aircraft (1941); enlarged derivative of Fw 200; project only
DFS 301 Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Segelflug Project only; no details, but possibly related to DFS 346
(302...308) Not assigned
Me 309 Messerschmitt Single-seat fighter (1942); prototype only
Me 310 Messerschmitt Twin-engine high-altitude fighter; derivative of Me 210; project only
(311...312) Not assigned
8-313 Caproni Model Ca.313; three-engine bomber and reconnaissance aircraft (1940); built in Italy
(314) Not assigned
Hs 315 Henschel Possibly a missile project; no details available
(316) Not assigned
Do 317 Dornier Twin-engine heavy bomber (1942); development of Do 217 (originally designated Do 217R-5); prototypes only, for competition with Fw 191 and Ju 288
Do 318 Dornier Three-engine long-range reconnaissance and rescue flying boat (1943); derivative of Do 24; project only
He 319 Heinkel Twin-engine high-speed multi-purpose combat aircraft (1943); derivative of He 219; project only
Me 320 Messerschmitt 8-320 was allocated to Messerschmitt, but no details are available; possibly not used
Me 321 Messerschmitt "Gigant"; very large cargo glider (1941); production 1941-1942
Ju 322 Junkers "Mammut"; very large cargo glider (1941); prototype only, for competition with Me 321
Me 323 (note 29) Messerschmitt "Gigant"; six-engine large transport (1942); powered variant of Me 321; production 1942-1944
(324) Not assigned
Fw 325 (note 30) Focke-Wulf 8-325 was allocated to Focke-Wulf, but no details are available; possibly not used
(326) Not assigned
Me 327 Messerschmitt Rocket-propelled interceptor project (1941); derivative of Me 163A, replaced by (or designation changed to) Me 163B
Me 328 Messerschmitt Me 328A: combat glider (1943); unpowered miniature single-seat fighter, to be towed into action; prototypes only
Me 328B: twin-jet anti-ship suicide attack aircraft (1944); pulsejet-powered version of Me 328A; prototypes only
Me 329 Messerschmitt Twin-engine tail-less fighter bomber (1944); project only
Fa 330 Focke-Achgelis "Bachstelze"; unpowered u-boat-based single-seat miniature observation autogyro (1942); production 1943-1945
DFS 331 Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Segelflug Large cargo glider; prototype only
DFS 332 Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Segelflug Twin-fuselage wing profile research aircraft (1944); not completed
Fi 333 Fieseler Twin-engine transport with detachable cargo pod (1944); project only
Ar 334 Arado 8-334 was allocated to Arado, but no details are available; possibly not used
Me 334 Messerschmitt Tail-less single-seat fighter (1942); based on Me 163; project only
Do 335 Dornier "Pfeil"; twin-engine heavy fighter and fighter-bomber (1943); pre-production only
Fa 336 Focke-Achgelis U-boat-based single-seat miniature observation helicopter (1944); powered derivative of Fa 330; prototypes completed in France post-war as SNCASO SE-3101
Ju 337 Junkers 8-337 was allocated to Junkers, but no details are available; possibly not used
(338) Not assigned
Fl 339 Flettner Two-seat observation helicopter (1944); project only
Ar 340 Arado Twin-engined medium bomber (1941); project only
8-341 T.H. Berlin-Charlottenburg Model B 9; twin-engined high-g research aircraft (1943); one prototype
8-342 Doblhoff (WNF) Often referred to as WNF 342; rotortip-jet powered research helicopter (1943); prototypes only
He 343 Heinkel Four-engine jet bomber and reconnaissance aircraft (1944); project only
8-344 Kramer (Ruhrstahl A.G.) Wire-guided air-to-air guided missile (1944); later designated as X-4; prototypes only
So 344 (note 31) Sombold Rocket-powered "parasite" fighter (1944), sometimes incorrectly called "Rammschussjäger" ("Ramming Fighter"); detachable high-explosive nose against tight bomber formations; project only
Go 345 Gotha Go 345A: cargo glider (1944); prototypes only
Go 345B: pulsejet-powered combat glider; derivative of Go 345A with twin pulsejets; project only
DFS 346 Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Segelflug Rocket-powered high-speed research aircraft (1944); prototype not completed (possibly completed and test flown post-war in the USSR)
8-347 Kramer (Ruhrstahl A.G.) Wire-guided anti-tank guided missile (1944); also designated as X-7; pre-production only
(348) Not assigned
Ba 349 Bachem "Natter"; rocket-powered semi-expendable point-defense interceptor (1945); prototypes only
(8-349 was probably the highest "sequential" number assigned; with very few exceptions, all higher allocations were "n x 100"-incremental numbers assigned to developments or follow-on projects of existing designs)
Ju 352 Junkers "Herkules"; three-engine cargo transport (1943); derivative of Ju 252 in non-metal construction
8-356   8-356 is associated both with a Fieseler project (based on Fi 156) and a Junkers project (no details)
Me 362 Messerschmitt Three-turbojet passenger airliner; project only
Me 364 (note 32) Messerschmitt Six-engine long-range bomber (1942); six-engine version of Me 264; project only
Me 368 Messerschmitt 8-368 was possibly allocated to Messerschmitt, but no details are available
Ju 388 Junkers Twin-engine high-altitude bomber and reconnaissance aircraft (1943); derivative of Ju 188; production 1944-1945
Ju 390 Junkers Six-engine long-range bomber and reconnaissance aircraft (1943); derivative of Ju 290; prototypes only
Fw 391 Focke-Wulf Based on Fw 191; project only
Ar 393 Arado 8-393 was possibly allocated to Arado, but no details are available
Ar 396 Arado Two-seat basic trainer (1944); derivative of Ar 96, mainly built of wood; post-war production in France (SIPA S.10/S.11)
Ta 400 Focke-Wulf Eight-engine (six piston, two turbojet) transatlantic-range heavy bomber (1944); project only
Me 409 Messerschmitt Twin-engine heavy fighter (1944); two Me 209 fuselages joined to common wing; project only
Me 410 Messerschmitt "Hornisse"; twin-engine two-seat heavy fighter, fighter-bomber, and reconnaissance aircraft (1943); derivative of Me 210; production 1943-1944
Do 417 Dornier Twin-engine multipurpose combat aircraft (1942); cancelled project, in competition with Ju 188
He 419 Heinkel Twin-engine high-altitude fighter (1944); derivative of He 219; prototype only
ZMe 423 Zeppelin / Messerschmitt Six-engine heavy transport aircraft (1943); derivative of Me 323; project only
Ka 430 Gotha Large cargo glider (1944); prototypes only
Ar 430 Arado Twin-engined utility amphibian (1942); project cancelled, and number 8-430 transferred to Gotha
Ar 432 Arado Four-engine transport aircraft (1944); derivative of Ar 232B made partially of wood
Do 435 Dornier Two-seat night-fighter (1944); derivative of Do 335; project only; see note 33
Ar 440 Arado Twin-engined high-altitude fighter (1944); derivative of Ar 240; prototypes only
8-445 Caudron Model C-445 "Goéland"; twin-engine transport (1936); captured in France
DFS 446 Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Segelflug Project only; no details (possibly related to DFS 346)
Ju 452 Junkers Three-engine cargo transport; derivative of Ju 252 in wooden construction; project only?
Me 462 (note 34) Messerschmitt Four-engine jet bomber (1945); project only
DFS 468 Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Segelflug Project(?); no details known
Ju 488 Junkers Four-engine high-altitude bomber (1945); used components of Ju 188, Ju 288 and Ju 388; prototypes not completed
Fw 491 Focke-Wulf Development of Fw 391; project only
He 500 Heinkel Designation originally allocated to "Volksjäger" jet fighter (1944); became He 162
Me 509 Messerschmitt Single-seat fighter (1943); derivative of Me 309; project only
Me 510 Messerschmitt Twin-engine fighter-bomber; derivative of Me 410; project only
He 519 Heinkel Single-engine high-speed bomber (1944); derivative of He 119; project only
8-520 Dewoitine Model D.520; single-seat fighter (1938); captured in France
ZSo 523 Zeppelin / SNCASO Six-engine large civilian transport aircraft (1943); derivative of ZMe 323; project only
Ar 532 Arado Four-engine heavy transport (1944); project cancelled
8-534 Avia Model B.534; single-seat biplane fighter (1934); captured in Czechoslovakia, and used for fighter training and glider towing
He 535 Dornier / Heinkel Mixed power (piston/turbojet) all-weather fighter and high-speed reconnaissance aircraft (1944); derivative of Do 335; originally designated Do 535, but later transferred to Heinkel as He 535; project only; see note 33
Me 609 Messerschmitt Twin-engine heavy fighter and high-speed bomber (1944); two Me 309 fuselages joined to common wing and tailplane; project only
Ar 632 Arado Four-engine heavy transport (1944); project cancelled
8-635 Heinkel / Dornier / Junkers Four-engine high-speed long-range reconnaissance aircraft (1945); two Do 335 fuselages joined by common wing; initial design work by Heinkel (He 635), project then transferred to Dornier (Do 635); later transferred to Junkers (Ju 635), who simplified the design for planned easier production; project only
Notes:
1. The inclusion of the Gö 8 and Gö 9 in the RLM-GL/C list would have been unusual, so the entries may be in error.

2. The "Messerschmitt" entry may be an error. It's possible that 8-27 was actually assigend to the Klemm Kl 27.

3. This entry may be an error, because it conflicts with the Do 29, and because Akaflieg (Akademische Fliegergruppe = University Flying Group) aircraft were normally not covered in the RLM-GL/C list.

4. The "Ju" prefixes for the Junkers models W 33, W 34, G 38, and A 48 were hardly ever used.

5. The allocation of number 8-53 to a model of only foreign license production would have been very unusual. Therefore the 8-53 may be an error.

6. The Fa 61 is called Fw 61 by many sources (including RLM documents of the time), because the Focke-Achgelis company was a direct descendant of a special research department of Focke-Wulf.

7. It is possible, that number 8-84 was later reserved for Junkers, but not used.

8. Number 8-100 was originally allocated to Fieseler, but requested by Heinkel as a "special" number for his aircraft, which was to break the absolute speed record.

9. The Fi 103 was also known as FZG 76 (FZG = Flak-Zielgerät = Anti-Aircraft Gun Targeting Device; misleading designation assigned for deception purposes), and as V-1 (V = Vergeltungswaffe = Vengeance Weapon; designation assigned by German propaganda). Prototypes of a manned version (effectively a suicide weapon) were tested as Fi 103R "Reichenberg".

10. The designation He 113 was used in 1940 by German propaganda for some He 100D-1, which were photographed with faked markings as "new German night-fighters".

11. Numbers 8-117, 8-272 and 8-281 were originally allocated to Heinkel, but not used. Allocation of 8-272 and 8-281 as Fw 272 and Fw 281 is unconfirmed, and somewhat questionable.

12. Numbers 8-132 and 8-183 were originally allocated to Bücker, but not used. For the later 8-183, Focke-Wulf initially assigned the number Fw 232, but this was changed by the RLM to Ta 183, because it conflicted with the Ar 232.

13. Numbers 8-153, 8-154 and 8-155 were originally allocated to Klemm, but not used.

14. Number 8-162 was reassigned to the "Volksjäger" for security purposes. It was originally intended to use the designation He 500.

15. The name "Volksjäger" was assigned to the He 162 by the RLM. Other names associated with this aircraft are "Salamander" (codename of the program) and "Spatz" (name of the aircraft, as assigned by Heinkel).

16. Number 8-163 was reassigned to the "Komet" for security purposes. Originally, the "Komet" was to be the Me 194, because it continued the development of the DFS 194. One development step was also known as Li 163.

17. The designation Ju 187 was assigned by Junkers, and not by the RLM.

18. Number 8-188 was originally allocated to Focke-Wulf, but transferred to Junkers at the request of the latter.

19. Number 8-193 was possibly originally allocated to AGO, but not used.

20. Number 8-200 was assigned out-of-sequence, because Focke-Wulf requested a "special" number for the Fw 200.

21. The cover designation "Dornier Do 200" was used by the Germans for captured Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress bombers used as bomber decoys and secret transports. The number 200 was probably derived from the designation of the unit using it, the I./KG 200.

22. Number 8-203 was possibly originally allocated to Siebel, but not used.

23. When it achieved the absolute world air-speed record in 1939, the Me 209V1 was designated as Me 109R for propaganda purposes (to make it appear as if the record had been flown by a derivative of the the German standard fighter Bf 109).

24. The Ta 211 designation was used by Focke-Wulf, because the planned engine was the Jumo 211.

25. The designations Fw 238, Fw 249 and Fw 261 were assigned in-house by Focke-Wulf, and not by the RLM. The same is most likely also true for the Fw 239 and Fw 251 numbers.

26. The actual identity of the He 275 project as a four-engined bomber is unconfirmed, and quite possibly incorrect.

27. Heinkel initially assigned the number He 180 to this project, but this was changed by the RLM to He 280, because it conflicted with the Bü 180.

28. Number 8-292 was originally allocated to Henschel, but not used.

29. The F-series was built by Luftschiffbau Zeppelin GmbH as ZMe 323F.

30. There are some references to a Focke-Achgelis Fa 325. However, the description which sometimes accompanies these references actually refer to the Fa 225, and therefore this Fa 325 is apparently a typo for Fa 225. However, given the lack of any further data on Fw 325 as well, it's still possible that Fw 325 is a typo for Fa 325, and that 8-325 was actually reserved for Focke-Achgelis (and used for an unknown project or not at all) instead of Focke-Wulf.

31. It is unclear if the designation So 344 was assigned privately by Sombold or officially by the RLM.

32. The designation Me 364, if it really existed, was assigned by Messerschmitt, and not by the RLM.

33. There are a few sources which have the identity of the 8-435 and 8-535 projects reversed, i.e. the night-fighter is listed as Do/He 535 and the mixed-power fighter as Do 435. However, this is probably incorrect.

34. The number 8-462 was proposed by Messerschmitt for their P-1107 project, but the RLM did most probably never officially allocate the number.

Sailplanes and Gliders

After 1933, all sailplane activities came under the supervision of the DFS (Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Segelflug - German Research Institute for Gliding Flight). The sailplanes and gliders were assigned model numbers with "108-" prefixes. The table is based on the list in source [9], which appears to be reliable and is the most complete table of "108-" numbers available so far. This source also says that the numbering started with 108-10.
Designation Manufacturer or Designer Remarks
108-10 Schneider "Grunau 9"; primary glider (1929)
108-11 RRG "Zögling 33"; primary glider (1933)
108-14 DFS "Schulgleiter" SG.38; standard basic gliding trainer (1938)
108-15 RRG "Zögling 12m"; primary glider (1934)
108-16 Weber EW-2; four-seat high-performance sailplane
108-21 Hirth Hi 21; two-seat sailplane
108-22 Hirth Hi 20 "MoSe" (for Motorsegler = motor glider); motorized glider
108-29   "Fliege IIa"; primary glider (1935)
108-30 DFS "Kranich II"; two-seat sailplane (1935)
108-47 Jacobs "Rhönadler"; single-seat high-performance sailplane (1932)
108-48 Dittmar "Condor I"; high-performance sailplane (1932)
108-49 Schneider / DFS "Grunau Baby II"; glider (1932)
108-50 Jacobs "Rhönbussard"; single-seat high-performance sailplane (1933)
108-51 Jacobs / DFS "Rhönsperber"; single-seat high-performance sailplane (1935)
108-53 DFS "Habicht"; single-seat acrobatics sailplane (1936)
108-56 Dittmar "Condor II"; single-seat high-performance sailplane (1935)
108-58 Hirth Göppingen Gö 1 "Wolf"; sailplane (1935)
108-59 Hirth Göppingen Gö 3 "Minimoa"; high-performance sailplane (1935)
108-60 Jacobs / DFS "Reiher"; single-seat high-performance sailplane (1937)
108-61 Hütter / Schempp-Hirth Göppingen Gö 4; two-seat sailplane (1937)
108-62 Schwarzwald-Flugzeugbau Donaueschingen "Strolch"; high-performance sailplane
108-63 Akaflieg München Mü 13D "Merlin"; high-performance sailplane (1936)
108-64 Schwarzwald-Flugzeugbau Donaueschingen "Ibis"
108-65 Dittmar / Schleicher "Condor III"; single-seat high-performance sailplane (1938)
108-66 Schneider "Grunau Baby III"; sailplane (1938)
108-67 Hütter H 17; sailplane (1937)
108-68 Jacobs / DFS "Weihe"; high-performance single-seat sailplane (1938)
108-70 Jacobs / DFS "Olympia Meise"; high-performance single-seat sailplane (1939)
108-72 Akaflieg München Mü 17 "Merle"; high-performance sailplane (1939)
108-74 FVA Aachen / Schmetz FVA 10b "Rheinland"; high-performance sailplane

3 German Aircraft Engine Designations

The designations of German aircraft engines were also standardized by the RLM in 1933, which allocated unique model numbers. Many engines existing in 1933 were redesignated in the new designation system.
Note: In the designation listings below, I try to give a complete list of aircraft which used (and projects which planned to use) each engine. Each aircraft is listed in the form "(Number of engines)RLM Designation". Usually only the basic designation (without specific model letters) is given. That means, that all - or almost all - models of this type used the engine. Exceptions are listed as users of the approriate alternate engine. If an entry is in brackets, the type was planned to use the engine, but not a single example was completed before the aircraft and/or engine was cancelled.

3.1 Piston Engines

Piston engines were designated by 3-digit model numbers, prefixed by the number 9 and a dash. Upper-case suffix letters were used to designate different versions of an engine. Each 100 block of model numbers was reserved for certain engine manufacturers, as follows:
  • 090-099 - various minor manufacturers
  • 100-199 - Bayerische Motorenwerke GmbH (BMW); later changed to 800 block
  • 200-299 - Junkers Flugzeug- und Motorenwerke A.G.
  • 300-399 - BMW-Flugmotorenwerke Brandenburg GmbH (BMW-Bramo)
  • 400-499 - Argus-Motoren GmbH
  • 500-599 - Heinkel Hirth Motoren GmbH
  • 600-699 - Daimler-Benz A.G.
  • 700-799 - Klöckner-Humboldt-Deutz A.G.
  • 800-899 - Bayerische Motorenwerke GmbH (BMW)

Designation List

The table includes all piston engines in the RLM list. If applicable, the designations are listed in the more common form with a manufacturer's prefix instead of RLM's "9-".
Designation Manufacturer Remarks; Applications
9-091 Breuer Model 5-F-8; air-cooled five-cylinder radial engine
9-092 Zündapp Model Z 9-092; air-cooled four-cylinder inline engine (1938);
used in (1)Kl 105, (2)Go 150, (1)Bü 180, (1)Si 202B, (1)Fi 253
9-094 Breuer Air-cooled five-cylinder radial engine; derivative of 9-091
BMW 112 BMW Water-cooled 12-cylinder inverted-vee engine; prototypes only
BMW 114 BMW Water-cooled nine-cylinder experimental radial engine; prototypes only
BMW 116 BMW Water-cooled 12-cylinder inverted-vee engine; prototypes only
BMW 132 BMW Air-cooled nine-cylinder radial engine;
used in (2)Do 17P, (2)Do 18L, (1)Ju 34, (1)Ju 46, (3)Ju 52/3m, (1)Fw 62, (4)Ju 90, (1)Ar 95, (1)He 114, (2)He 115, (1)Hs 123, (2)Hs 124, (1)Ha 137A, (2)Ha 140, (4)Ha 142, (1)Ju 160, (1)Ar 195, (1)Ar 196, (1)Ar 197, (4)Fw 200A/B
BMW 139 BMW Air-cooled 18-cylinder twin-radial engine (1939); two BMW 132 rows; prototypes only
- Junkers Model L 55; water-cooled 12-cylinder vee engine (1927)
- Junkers Model L 88; water-cooled 12-cylinder vee engine (1929); derivative of L 55;
used in (1)Ju 49, (4)K 51
Jumo 204 Junkers Originally known as Jumo 4; water-cooled six-cylinder inline diesel engine (1930);
used in (4)Ju 38
Jumo 205 Junkers Originally known as Jumo 5; water-cooled six-cylinder inline diesel engine; derivative of Jumo 204;
used in (2)Do 18, (4)Do 26, (2)Ju 86, [(4)He 120], (3)BV 138, (4)Ha 139
Jumo 206 Junkers Diesel engine
Jumo 207 Junkers Water-cooled six-cylinder inline high-altitude diesel engine; derivative of Jumo 205;
used in (2)Ju 86P/R, (6)BV 222C
Jumo 208 Junkers Water-cooled six-cylinder inline diesel engine; derivative of Jumo 205;
used in [(4)Ju 186], [(6)Ju 286]
Jumo 210 Junkers Water-cooled 12-cylinder inverted-vee engine (1936);
used in (1)Ar 68E, (1)Ar 80, (1)Ar 81, (1)Ju 87A, (1)Bf 109A/B/C, (1)He 112, (1)Ha 137B, (1)Fw 159, (2)Fw 187, [(2)Ao 225]
Jumo 211 Junkers Water-cooled 12-cylinder inverted-vee engine; derivative of Jumo 210;
used in (1)Ju 87, (2)Ju 88A/C/D/N/P, (2)He 111E/H, (5)He 111Z, (2)Ta 154, (3)Ju 252, (4)Me 264
Jumo 213 Junkers Water-cooled 12-cylinder inverted-vee engine; derivative of Jumo 211;
used in (2)Ju 88G, (1)Ta 152H, [(1)Ju 187], (2)Ju 188A/D/G/H/S/T, (1)Fw 190D, [(2)Ta 254], [(1)Do 435]
Jumo 218 Junkers Water-cooled 12-cylinder diesel engine; two connected Jumo 208; project only
Jumo 222 Junkers Water-cooled 24-cylinder quad-radial engine (1941); prototypes only;
used in [(2)Hü 211], (2)He 219C, [(8)Fw 249], [(1)Fw 272], (2)Ju 288A/B, [(2)Ar 340]
Jumo 223 Junkers Water-cooled 12-cylinder "X" diesel engine; two connected Jumo 207; prototypes only
Jumo 224 Junkers Water-cooled 24-cylinder "X" diesel engine; four connected Jumo 207; prototype only
Bramo 301 BMW-Bramo Air-cooled nine-cylinder radial engine (1940); derivative of Bramo 323;
used in (1)Fa 223
9-314 BMW-Bramo/Siemens Model Sh 14; air-cooled seven-cylinder radial engine (1930);
used in (2)Wn 11, (2)Wn 15, (1)8-29, (1)Kl 31, (1)Kl 32, (1)Kl 36B, (1)Fw 44, (1)Fa 61, (1)Ar 69B, (1)He 72, (1)Bü 133, (1)Ha 135, (1)Ha 136A, (1)He 172, (1)Fl 184, (1)Fl 185, (1)Fl 265, (1)Fl 282, (1)WNF 342
9-322 BMW-Bramo Model Sh 22/SAM 22 (later Bramo 322); air-cooled nine-cylinder radial engine (1933);
used in (4)Do 19, (1)He 46, (1)Fi 98, (1)Hs 122
Bramo 323 BMW-Bramo "Fafnir"; air-cooled nine-cylinder radial engine; derivative of Bramo 322;
used in (2)Do 17L/M/U/Z, (3)Do 24T, (1)Hs 126, (1)BV 141A, (1)Ar 198, (4)Fw 200C, [(2)Fw 206], (6)BV 222A/B, (4)Ar 232B, [(1)Fa 266], [(3)Do 318], [(2)Fi 333], (3)Ju 352, [(2)Ar 430], (4)Ar 432
Bramo 328 BMW-Bramo Model Sh 28; seven-cylinder radial engine (1935); project only
Bramo 329 BMW-Bramo Model Sh 29; 14-cylinder twin-radial engine; project only
- Argus Model As 8; air-cooled four-cylinder inline engine (1929);
used in (1)Kl 26, (1)He 64, (1)Al 101, (1)Ha 136B
- Argus Model As 10; air-cooled eight-cylinder inverted-vee engine (1930);
used in (1)Fw 43, (1)Fw 47, (1)Fw 55, (1)Fw 56, (2)Fw 57, (1)He 63, (1)Ar 66, (1)He 74, (1)Ar 76, (2)Ar 77, (1)Ar 96A, (1)Al 102, (1)Al 103, (1)Bf 108B, (1)Hs 121, (1)Hs 125, (1)Go 145, (1)Go 147, (1)Go 149, [(1)Kl 151], (1)Fi 156, (1)Bf 163, (1)Fw 186, (2)Ao 192, (1)Si 201, (1)Me 208, [(1)Fa 224], (2)Ho 226, (1)Fi 256, (1)Sk 257, (2)We 271, [(1)Fl 339]
As 401 Argus Air-cooled eight-cylinder inverted-vee engine (1937); derivative of As 10C
As 402 Argus used in [(2)Fw 189G]
As 410 Argus Air-cooled 12-cylinder inverted-vee engine (1938);
used in (1)Ar 96B/C, (2)Hs 129A, (2)Fw 189, (1)Ar 199, (2)Si 204A
As 411 Argus Air-cooled 12-cylinder inverted-vee engine; derivative of As 410;
used in [(2)Me 164],(2)Fw 189F, (2)Si 204D, (1)Ar 396
As 412 Argus Air-cooled 24-cylinder "H" engine (1934); prototypes only
As-413 Junkers/Argus Air-cooled "H" engine; project only
- Hirth Model HM 60; air-cooled four-cylinder inline engine (1930);
used in (1)Fi 5, (1)Kl 25, (1)Fi 157, (1)FK 166, (2)Ho 252
- Hirth Model HM 150; air-cooled eight-cylinder inline engine (1932)
HM 500 Heinkel/Hirth Air-cooled four-cylinder inline engine (1939); derivative of HM 504;
used in (1)Kl 106, (1)Kl 107
HM 501 Heinkel/Hirth Air-cooled six-cylinder inline engine (1939); derivative of HM 506;
used in (1)Ar 231
HM 504 Heinkel/Hirth Air-cooled four-cylinder inline engine (1933);
used in (1)Kl 35, (1)Ar 69A, (1)Ar 79, (1)Bü 131, (1)Bü 134, (1)Bü 181
HM 506 Heinkel/Hirth Air-cooled six-cylinder inline engine (1934);
used in (1)Fi 99, (1)Fi 158, (2)Go 241
HM 508 Heinkel/Hirth Originally known as HM 8; air-cooled eight-cylinder inverted-vee engine (1937);
used in (1)Kl 36A, (2)Fh 104, (1)Bf 108A, (4)He 116, (2)Go 146
HM 512 Heinkel/Hirth Air-cooled 12-cylinder inverted-vee engine (1938);
used in (1)Bf 108C
HM 515 Heinkel/Hirth Air-cooled four-cylinder inline engine (1938);
used in (1)Si 202C
DB 600 Daimler-Benz Water-cooled 12-cylinder inverted-vee engine (1932);
used in (2)Do 17S, (4)Ju 89, (1)Bf 109D, (2)Bf 110A/B, (2)He 111B/G, (2)Hs 127, (2)Bf 161, (2)Bf 162
DB 601 Daimler-Benz Water-cooled 12-cylinder inverted-vee engine (1933); derivative of DB 600;
used in (1)He 100, (1)Bf 109E/F/H, (2)Bf 110C/D/E/F, (2)He 111P, (1)He 118, (2)Hs 128, (1)Fi 167, (1)Me 209, (2)Me 210A/B, (2)Do 215, (2)Do 217A/C, (2)Ar 240A, (2)Me 261, [(2)Fa 269], (1)He 270
DB 602 Daimler-Benz Originally designated LOF 6; water-cooled 12-cylinder vee engine;
used in LZ-129 "Hindenburg" airship
DB 603 Daimler-Benz Water-cooled 12-cylinder inverted-vee engine; derivative of DB 601;
used in (2)Hs 130E, (1)Ta 152C, (1)Ta 153, [(1)Me 155A], (1)BV 155B/C, [(6)Do 216], (2)Do 217M/N/P, (2)He 219, (6)BV 238, (2)Ar 240C, [(6)BV 250], [(2)Me 265], (4)He 274, [(4)He 277], [(4)Fw 300], (1)Me 309, [(2)Me 310], (2)Do 317, [(2)He 319], [(2)Me 329], (2)Do 335, (2)Me 410, [(2)Do 417], (2)He 419, (2)Ar 440, [(4)8-635]
DB 604 Daimler-Benz Water-cooled 24-cylinder "X" engine (1942); prototype only
DB 605 Daimler-Benz Water-cooled 12-cylinder inverted-vee engine; derivative of DB 601;
used in (1)Bf 109G/K, (2)Bf 110G, (2)Hs 130A, (2)Me 210C/D, (2)Ar 240B, [(1)Me 334], [(1)Me 509], [(2)Me 609]
DB 606 Daimler-Benz Water-cooled 24-cylinder double-inverted-vee engine; two connected DB 601;
used in (1)He 119, (2)He 177A
DB 607 Daimler-Benz 12-cylinder inline diesel engine (1941); prototypes only
DB 609 Daimler-Benz Water-cooled 16-cylinder inverted-vee engine (1943); prototypes only
DB 610 Daimler-Benz Water-cooled 24-cylinder double-inverted-vee engine; two connected DB 605;
used in (2)He 177A, (2)Fw 191, (2)Ju 288C
DB 612 Daimler-Benz Water-cooled 12-cylinder inverted-vee engine; derivative of DB 601; prototypes only
DB 613 Daimler-Benz Water-cooled 24-cylinder double-inverted-vee engine; two connected DB 603; project only;
planned for [(8)Do 214], [(1)He 519]
DB 614 Daimler-Benz Water-cooled 24-cylinder "X" engine (1942); derivative of DB 604; project only
DB 619 Daimler-Benz Water-cooled 24-cylinder engine
DB 621 Daimler-Benz Water-cooled 12-cylinder inverted-vee engine (1941); derivative of DB 605; prototype only
DB 622 Daimler-Benz Water-cooled 12-cylinder inverted-vee engine (1941); derivative of DB 603; project only
DB 623 Daimler-Benz Water-cooled 12-cylinder inverted-vee high-altitude engine (1942); derivative of DB 603G; prototypes only
DB 627 Daimler-Benz Water-cooled 12-cylinder inverted-vee high-altitude engine (1944); derivative of DB 603G; prototypes only
DB 628 Daimler-Benz Water-cooled 12-cylinder inverted-vee high-altitude engine (1944); derivative of DB 605; prototypes only
DB 632 Daimler-Benz Water-cooled 12-cylinder inverted-vee engine; derivative of DB 603N; prototypes only
DZ 710 Deutz Water-cooled 16-cylinder opposed-cylinder diesel engine; prototype only
DZ 720 Deutz Water-cooled opposed-cylinder diesel engine; project only
- BMW Model BMW VI; water-cooled 12-cylinder vee engine;
used in (1)Do 10, (2)Do 13C, (2)Do 14, (2)Do 15, (2)Do 16, (2)Do 17A/C/E/F, (2)Do 23, [(2)Fw 42], (1)He 45, (1)He 49, (1)He 51, (1)He 52, (2)He 59, (1)He 60, (1)He 61, (1)Ar 65, (1)Ar 68F, (1)He 70, (2)He 111C
- BMW Model BMW VII; water-cooled 12-cylinder vee engine;
used in (1)Ju 52/1m
- BMW Model BMW X; air-cooled five-cylinder radial engine
BMW 801 BMW Air-cooled 14-cylinder twin-radial engine (1939);
used in (2)Ju 88B/H/S/T, (1)BV 141B, (2)BV 144, (4)He 177B, (2)Ju 188E/F/R, (1)Fw 190, (2)Do 217E/J/K, [(4)He 220], (1)Ar 232A, [(1)BV 237], [(4)Fw 261], [(2)Fa 284], (4)Ju 290, (2)Ju 388, (6)Ju 390, [(6)Ta 400], [(4)Ju 488], [(4)Ar 532], [(4)Ar 632]
BMW 802 BMW Air-cooled 18-cylinder twin-radial engine; derivative of BMW 801; prototypes not completed
BMW 803 BMW Water-cooled 28-cylinder twin-radial engine; prototypes only;
used in [(4)Fw 238]
BMW 804 BMW Air-cooled 14-cylinder twin-radial engine (1942); project only
BMW 805 BMW Twin-radial engine (1944); development of BMW 801; project only
- Deicke Model ADM-7; air-cooled two-cylinder opposed-cylinder engine
- Krautter Air-cooled four-cylinder opposed-cylinder engine (1939); prototypes only
- Kroeber Model M 4; air-cooled two-cylinder opposed-cylinder engine (1935)
- Seld Model F 2; air-cooled two-cylinder inline engine (1938)

3.2 Jet Engines

Similar to piston engines, jet engines of all types (turbojet, turboprop, ramjet, pulsejet, rocket) were also designated by 3-digit model numbers, but used a prefix number of 109. To distinguish between air-breathing and rocket engines, the former received numbers in the range 001-499, while the latter used the range 500-999. Initially, the numbers were allocated sequentially in each range. This was soon changed so that the third digit of the model number indicated the manufacturer of the engine. This digit was - with the exception of "1" for Heinkel - chosen to match the 100 block number assigned to this manufacturer for piston engines. The following tables show which last digit was assigned to which manufacturer:
Air-breathing engines:
  • 1 - Heinkel Hirth Motorenwerke
  • 2 - Junkers Flugzeug- und Motorenwerke A.G.
  • 4 - Argus-Motoren GmbH
  • 6 - Daimler-Benz A.G.
  • 8 - Bayerische Motorenwerke GmbH (BMW)
Rocket engines:
  • 2 - Westphälisch-Anhaltische Sprengstoff A.G. (WASAG)
  • 3 - Schmidding
  • 5 - Rheinmetall-Borsig A.G.
  • 8 - Bayerische Motorenwerke GmbH (BMW)
  • 9 - Hellmuth Walter K.G. (HWK)

Designation List

The table includes all jet engines in the RLM list. Other than for aircraft and piston engines, jet engine designations are usually quoted with the "109-" prefix of RLM.
Designation Manufacturer Remarks; Applications
- Heinkel Model HeS 3; centrifugal-flow turbojet (1938); world's first flyable turbojet; used in (1)He 178
109-001 Heinkel Model HeS 8; centrifugal-flow turbojet (1939); used in (2)He 280
109-002 BMW Model P-3304; axial-flow turbojet with contra-rotating stages (1940); project only
109-003 BMW Model P-3302; axial-flow turbojet (1940); production 1943-1945; used in (1)Hs 132A, (1)He 162, (4)Ar 234C, [(2)Fw 272], [(6)Ju 287A]
109-004 Junkers "Orkan"; axial-flow turbojet (1940); production 1944-1945; used in (2)Go 229, (2)Ar 234A/B, (2)Me 262, [(2)Ju 268], (4)Ju 287V1, [(2)Ta 400]
109-005 Porsche Jet engine (no details available); probably a project only
109-006 Junkers/Heinkel Model HeS 30; axial-flow turbojet (1942); prototypes only
109-007 Daimler-Benz Axial-flow turbojet (1943); prototypes only
109-011 Heinkel Model HeS 11; centrifugal/axial-flow turbojet (1945); prototype only; used in [(1)Ta 183], [(2)Fw 250], [(4)He 343], [(1)Do 435]
109-012 Junkers Axial-flow turbojet (1945); prototype not completed
109-014 Argus Pulsejet (1942); production 1943-1945; used in (1)Fi 103, (1)He 162A-10, (2)Me 328B, [(2)Go 345B]
109-016 Daimler-Benz Turbojet (1945); project only; planned for projected Daimler-Benz bombers
109-018 BMW Axial-flow turbojet (1944); enlarged development of 109-003; prototype not completed
109-021 Heinkel Model HeS 21; centrifugal/axial-flow turboprop (1945); turboprop version of 109-011; project only; planned for [(1)Fw 281]
109-022 Junkers Axial-flow turboprop (1945); turboprop version of 109-012; project only
109-028 BMW Axial-flow turboprop (1944); turboprop version of 109-018; project only
109-044 Argus Pulsejet; derivative of 109-014; used in [(1)He 162A-11]
109-500 Walter Liquid-fuel rocket (1937); standard German RATO rocket 1938-1945
109-501 Walter Liquid-fuel rocket; pre-production only; used as RATO rocket, and in (1)BV 143
109-502 Rheinmetall Solid-fuel rocket; used as RATO rocket
109-505 Rheinmetall Solid-fuel rocket; used in "Feuerlilie 25" SAM
109-506 WASAG Two-stage solid-fuel rocket; used in (1)8-347
109-507 Walter Liquid-fuel rocket; used in (1)Hs 293, (2)Hs 294, (2)Hs 295
109-508 ? Possibly a cancelled liquid-fuel rocket, intended for He P.1077 "Julia"
109-509 Walter Liquid-fuel rocket; production 1943-1945; used in (1)Me 163B/C, (1)DFS 228, (1)Ju 248, (1)Me 263, [(1)So 344], (2)DFS 346, (1)Ba 349
109-510 BMW Model P-3390A; liquid-fuel rocket; planned for (1)Me 163B/C, but not used
109-511 BMW Model P-3374; liquid-fuel rocket; used in (1)Hs 298
109-512 WASAG Solid-fuel rocket; used in (1)Hs 293G
109-513 Schmidding Model G-9; liquid-fuel rocket; used in (1)Hs 293D, (1)Hs 298
109-515 Rheinmetall Solid-fuel rocket; used in "Feuerlilie 55" SAM
109-522 WASAG Solid-fuel rocket; used as RATO rocket
109-528 BMW Model P-3377; liquid-fuel rocket; used in LT 1000 glide torpedo
109-532 WASAG Solid-fuel rocket; used as brake rocket in cargo gliders
109-533 Schmidding Solid-fuel rocket; used in (4)Ba 349(booster)
109-543 Schmidding Solid-fuel rocket; used in (1)Hs 298
109-548 BMW Model P-3378; liquid-fuel rocket; used in (1)8-344
109-553 Schmidding Solid-fuel rocket; used in (2)Hs 117(booster)
109-558 BMW Model P-3386; liquid-fuel rocket; used in (1)Hs 117H
109-559 Walter Liquid-fuel rocket (1944); planned for Ba 349A, but not used
109-563 Schmidding Solid-fuel rocket; used as RATO rocket
109-573 Schmidding Solid-fuel rocket; used for underwater rocket propulsion tests
109-593 Schmidding Solid-fuel rocket; used as RATO rocket
109-603 Schmidding Solid-fuel rocket; used in 8-344 test models
109-613 Konrad Liquid-fuel rocket; used in "Enzian E-4" SAM
109-708 BMW Model P-3390C; liquid-fuel rocket; used in (1)Hs 117
109-718 BMW Model P-3395; liquid-fuel rocket (1944); used as add-on rocket to 109-003R turbojet
109-719 Walter Rocket; planned for unspecified glide bomb
109-729 Walter Liquid-fuel rocket; used in (1)Hs 117
109-739 Walter Liquid-fuel rocket
- Walter Model R I-203; liquid-fuel rocket (1938); used in (1)He 176, (1)DFS 194
- Walter Model R II-203; liquid-fuel rocket (1941); used in Me 163A

4 Sources

[1] Heinz J. Nowarra: "Die deutsche Luftrüstung 1933-1945"
[2] J.R. Smith, Anthony Kay: "German Aircraft of the Second World War"
[3] Ferenc A. Vajda, Peter Dancey: "German Aircraft Industry and Production 1933-1945"
[4] Joachim Dressel, Manfred Griehl: "Die deutschen Raketenflugzeuge 1935-1945"
[5] David Masters: "German Jet Genesis"
[6] USAAF Air Materiel Command: "List of German Air Ministry Aircraft Numbers" (Foreign Equipment Descriptive Brief 46-6B, 21 August 1946)
[7] Manfred Griehl: "Jet Planes of the Third Reich"
[8] Wikipedia article: "RLM aircraft designation system"
[9] Wikipedia article: "RLM numbering system for gliders and sailplanes"

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